Skip to main content

About your Search

20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2
, and a joint investigation by abc news and the food and environment reporting network found more than 100 reported illnesses due to blue-green algae exposure. >> essentially if we don't solve this problem, somebody's going to die. >> reporter: ohio state's dr. jeffery reutter is the foremost authority on blue-green algae. he says it's a nationwide problem, largely caused by farm fertilizer runoff. the cure, he says, is convincing farmers to carefully fertilize so the nutrients stay on the fields and not in the water. >> otherwise, these blooms are going to continue to grow. the human health problems that we see are going to increase. >> reporter: assaulting our senses, our economy and our health. jim avila, abc news, lake petenwell, wisconsin. >> our thanks to jim tonight. >>> and in los angeles, a bridge demolition that forced officials to shut one of america's busiest highways, the 405 freeway went according to plan. fears of a massive traffic nightmare, the so-called carmageddon, were not realized. drivers steered clear of the area, and the lanes are expected to re-open as planned for
, and a joint investigation by abc news and the food & environment reporting network found more than 100 reported illnesses due to blue/green algae exposure. >> essentially if we don't solve this problem, somebody's going to die. >> reporter: ohio state's dr. jeffrey reuter is the foremost authority on blue/green algae. he says it's a nationwide problem caused by farm fertilizer runoff. the cure, he says, is convincing farmers to carefully fertilize so nutrients stay on the fields and not in the water. >> otherwise these blooms are going to continue to grow. the human health problems that we see are going to increase. >> reporter: assaulting our senses, our economy, and our health. jim avila, abc news, lake petenwell, wisconsin. >> that is nasty stuff. >> oh, that's an understand statement, but the wisconsin department of natural resources says the best way to treat this is naturally, but they say it could take several years to get rid of it completely. in fact, there was a large amount of -- lake erie, almost a third of the surface, covered. >> cut big time into the fishing industry the
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2